Reducing Justice Involvement For People with Mental Illness.

VETERAN RESOURCES BY FOCUS AREA

General/Veterans Involved in the Criminal Justice System
Family Alliance for Veterans of America (FAVA)
  • FAVA is a new national organization that provides support to veteran and their families. FAVA's mission statement is to provide information, education, advocacy and support to families of veterans. This national organization also provides education to communities, entities, and organizations.
Responding to the Needs of Women Veterans Involved in the Criminal Justice System (National Institute of Corrections)
Veterans Treatment Courts: A Second Chance For Vets Who Have Lost Their Way
  • The NIC broadcast on this topic is now available for viewing on the NIC website. Click here to link to this broadcast.
Healthcare for Re-Entry Veterans (HCRV) Contacts
National Center for Veterans Analysis and Statistics (NCVAS) - Veteran Population
  • An overview of the veteran population in the US, summarized by state and supplemented with various descriptive tables.
National Clearinghouse for Veterans Treatment Courts
  • Information clearinghouse on Veterans Treatment Courts including various links to U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, studies, related legislation, and media articles.
National Institute of Corrections Justice Involved Veterans Web Page
  • This web page has been developed in an effort to provide current and useful information to correctional agencies regarding the population of justice-involved veterans. Highlighted on the web page are two NIC projects: the Veterans Treatment Court Project and the Veterans Risk and Needs Assessment Tool and Protocol Project.
Real Warriors, Real Battles, Real Strengths
  • The Real Warriors Campaign is an initiative launched by the Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury (DCoE) to promote the processes of building resilience, facilitating recovery and supporting reintegration of returning service members, veterans and their families.
SAMHSA Military Families Fact Sheet
  • SAMHSA's support of behavioral health systems serving service members, veterans, and their families works with States, Territories, and Tribes to strengthen behavioral health care systems for Service Members, Veterans, and their Families (SMVF). Click the link above to read more about SAMHSA's support for behavioral health systems, the key objectives and activities.
U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Veterans Justice Outreach Specialist
  • The purpose of the Veteran Justice Outreach Initiative (VJO) initiative is to avoid the unnecessary criminalization of mental illness and extended incarceration among Veterans by ensuring that eligible justice-involved Veterans have timely access to VHA mental health and substance abuse services when clinically indicated, and other VA services and benefits as appropriate.
U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Veterans Justice Outreach Specialist Contact List
  • Email and phone contacts for Veterans Justice Outreach Specialists nationwide.

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Veterans and Homelessness
National Center on Homelessness Among Veterans
  • The National Center on Homelessness Among Veterans is a forum to exchange new ideas; provide education and consultation to improve the delivery of services; and disseminate the knowledge gained through the efforts of the Center's Research and Model Development Cores to VA, other federal agencies, and community provider programs that assist homeless populations.
Project CHALENG
  • Project CHALENG (Community Homelessness Assessment, Local Education and Networking Groups) for Veterans, an innovative program designed to enhance the continuum of care for homeless Veterans provided by the local VA and its surrounding community service agencies. The guiding principle behind Project CHALENG is that no single agency can provide the full spectrum of services required to help homeless Veterans become productive members of society. Project CHALENG enhances coordinated services by bringing the VA together with community agencies and other federal, state, and local governments who provide services to the homeless to raise awareness of homeless Veterans' needs and to plan to meet those needs.
U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs
  • Information about prevention, treatment, housing, employment services for homeless veterans available from the Veterans Affairs.

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Accessing VA Behavioral Healthcare
Department of Veterans Affairs Forms:
Federal Benefits for Veterans, Dependents and Survivors
  • U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs (VA) Benefits Book 2011 Edition, released online.
National Resource Directory
  • The National Resource Directory (NRD) is an online resource for wounded, ill and injured Service Members, Veterans, their families and those who support them. The NRD provides information on, and access to, medical and non-medical services and resources across the country which will help them reach their personal and professional goals as they successfully transition from recovery to community living.
VA Health Care VISN 4 - Pennsylvania, Delaware, and South Jersey
  • VISN 4 is an integrated system consisting of ten VA Medical Centers including Altoona, Butler, Clarksburg, Coatesville, Erie, Lebanon, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Wilkes-Barre, and Wilmington.
VISN 4 Operation OEF/OIF Veterans
  • Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) / Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) program is tailored to meet the specific health care needs of our newest Veterans. Veterans have five years from their date of discharge to receive free health care for any combat-related condition. After the five years, a co-payment status will depend on whether your illness or injury is found to be service-connected..

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Veterans and PTSD
Creating Cultures of Trauma Informed Care (CCTIC)
  • The Creating Cultures of Trauma-Informed Care (CCTIC) model engages the system or organization in a culture change, emphasizing core values of safety, trustworthiness, choice, collaboration, and empowerment in every facet of program activities, physical settings, and relationships. Implementing cultural shifts of this scope requires the full participation of administrators; supervisory, direct service, and support staff: and consumers.
Kyle Hausmann-Stokes Film: Now, After
  • His first film, "Now, After" a disturbingly visceral account of PTSD, was quickly embraced by the Department of Veteran Affairs and subsequently is being used in their hospitals nationwide as a training aid.
National Center for Post Traumatic Stress Disorder
  • The National Center for PTSD website contains up to date information about PTSD and traumatic stress for Mental Health Care Providers. Fact Sheets on Assessments, Types of Trauma, and Treatment are also available. In the Training and Education section, there are links to handouts, manuals, videos as well as our new training program, PTSD 101.
National Center for Trauma Informed Care
  • CMHS's National Center for Trauma-Informed Care (NCTIC) is a technical assistance center dedicated to building awareness of trauma-informed care and promoting the implementation of trauma-informed practices in programs and services.
Prolonged Exposure Therapy
  • Prolonged Exposure (PE) Therapy for Posttraumatic Stress Disorders is a cognitive-behavioral treatment program for adult men and women (ages 18-65+) who have experienced single or multiple/continuous traumas and have posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The program consists of a course of individual therapy designed to help clients process traumatic events and reduce their PTSD symptoms as well as depression, anger, and general anxiety. PE has three components: (1) psychoeducation about common reactions to trauma and the cause of chronic posttrauma difficulties, (2) imaginal exposure (also called revisiting the trauma memory in imagination), repeated recounting of the traumatic memory, and (3) in vivo exposure, gradually approaching trauma reminders (e.g., situations, objects) that are feared and avoided despite being safe. Treatment is individualized and is conducted by social workers, psychologists, psychiatrists, and other therapists trained to use the PE manual, which specifies the agenda and treatment procedures for each session. Standard treatment consists of 8-15 sessions conducted once or twice weekly for 90 minutes each. The duration of treatment can be shortened or lengthened depending on the needs of the client and his or her rate of progress.
SAMHSA Overview of Trauma Informed Care and Trauma Specific Interventions
  • The website and article discuss several trauma interventions available including: Addiction and Trauma Recovery Integration Model (ATRIUM); Essence of Being Real; Risking Connection; Sanctuary Model; Seeking Safety; Trauma, Addictions, Mental Health, and Recovery (TAMAR) Model; Trauma Affect Regulation: Guide for Education and Therapy (TARGET); and Trauma Recovery and Empowerment Model (TREM and M-TREM)..
Trauma Affective Regulation: Guide for Education and Therapy (TARGET)
  • Trauma Affect Regulation: Guide for Education and Therapy (TARGET) is a strengths-based approach to education and therapy for survivors of physical, sexual, psychological, and emotional trauma. TARGET teaches a set of seven skills (summarized by the acronym FREEDOM--Focus, Recognize triggers, Emotion self-check, Evaluate thoughts, Define goals, Options, and Make a contribution) that can be used by trauma survivors to regulate extreme emotion states, manage intrusive trauma memories, promote self-efficacy, and achieve lasting recovery from trauma. TARGET can be adapted to assist men and women from various age groups, cultures, and ethnicities who have had a variety of traumatic experiences. This program can be offered in 10-12 individual or group counseling or psychoeducational sessions conducted by clinicians, case managers, rehabilitation specialists, or teachers.
Trauma Informed Care Frameworks: Sanctuary Model
  • The Sanctuary Model® is a trauma-informed, evidence-supported template for system change based on the active creation and maintenance of a nonviolent, democratic, productive community to help people heal from trauma.
Trauma Recovery Empowerment Model
  • The Trauma Recovery and Empowerment Model (TREM) is a fully manualized group-based intervention designed to facilitate trauma recovery among women with histories of exposure to sexual and physical abuse. Drawing on cognitive restructuring, psychoeducational, and skills-training techniques, the gender-specific 24-29 session group emphasizes the development of coping skills and social support. It addresses both short- and long-term consequences of violent victimization, including mental health symptoms, especially posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression, and substance abuse. TREM has been successfully implemented in a wide range of service settings (mental health, substance abuse, criminal justice) and among diverse racial and ethnic populations.
Trauma Specific Interventions: Seeking Safety
  • Seeking Safety is a present-focused treatment for clients with a history of trauma and substance abuse. The treatment was designed for flexible use: group or individual format, male and female clients, and a variety of settings (e.g., outpatient, inpatient, residential). Seeking Safety focuses on coping skills and psychoeducation and has five key principles: (1) safety as the overarching goal (helping clients attain safety in their relationships, thinking, behavior, and emotions); (2) integrated treatment (working on both posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and substance abuse at the same time); (3) a focus on ideals to counteract the loss of ideals in both PTSD and substance abuse; (4) four content areas: cognitive, behavioral, interpersonal, and case management; and (5) attention to clinician processes (helping clinicians work on countertransference, self-care, and other issues).
VA/DoD CLINICAL PRACTICE GUIDELINE FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF POST-TRAUMATIC STRESS (2004)
  • This Guideline builds on DoD and VA expertise to promote state-of-the-art assessment and intervention. Because research on traumatic stress is still in its infancy, the Working Group had to base a number of recommendations on opinion rather than evidence. Thus, in laying out the best available evidence-based, clinically informed practices, this Clinical Practice Guideline has the potential to generate still better science and newer, more effective practice- but like any tool, it will only be of service to the extent that it is used.

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